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Waste Aware Construction

Why Waste Aware?

The True Cost Of Waste

  • Purchase price of materials being wasted
  • skip hire and transport pickup
  • onsite sorting, handling and managing time
  • poor packing or overfilling of skips leads to double handling
  • lost income from not salvaging from waste.

 


Why Be Waste Aware?

Reduce

  • Reduce the amount of money spent on waste.
  • Reduce waste disposal costs, e.g. handling charges, transport and taxes/levies.
  • Reduce the amount of raw material used.
  • Reduce the amount of waste on site.
  • Reduce transport of waste movements to recycling centres or landfill.
  • Reduce the amount of effort used to do a repetitive job.
  • Reduce the amount of time lost taking waste to a skip. Mini recycling points are more convienient.
  • Reduce the amount of handling and storing waste on-site.
  • Reduce the need for double handling.
  • Reduce land-use, ecological damage, noise and pollution during waste disposal.

Improve

  • Improves efficiency on-site.
  • Influence worker habits while a relative degree of choice exists for disposal costs/options.
  • Better jobsite tidiness = improved health and safety.
  • Improves the site image.
  • Improves site management processes.
  • Improves knowledge of waste figures for specific sites; if you know the problems then you can find solutions.
  • Starts benchmarking, target making and auditing.
  • Promotes best practice on-site.
  • Possible links to Constructing Excellence as demonstration sites.
  • Compliance with legislation.
  • Environmentally positive and proactive.
  • Implements environmental policies of businesses.

Waste minimisation and awareness saves companies money.

 


Waste Aware Facts

  • According to the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, Construction and Demolition (C&D) produces between 70-120million tonnes of waste annually. The Symonds Group report suggests around 30million tonnes of core C&D waste with an additional 40million tonnes of excavation waste. Of this figure, 40.3m tonnes (57%) was recycled.
  • Most of the C&D waste comes from earthwork and excavation, demolition and construction activities, with the latter waste streams being predominantly wood, plasterboard and cardboard packaging which collectively amount to 80% of construction waste in terms of weight per meter square of the build. Metals comprise the fourth significant waste stream.
  • Current volumes of wastage in the construction industry are as follows:
Waste Stream
Percentage (%) of waste by volume in comparison to the total volume

Packaging

24.2
Cardboard
17.2
Drywall (plasterboard)
16.6
Timber
14.8
Plaster
11.6
Plastic
11.1
Inert
10.3
Bricks
7.5
Ferrous metal (steel)
6.4
Concrete
6.0
Insulation
4.5
Tiles
3.8
Ceramics
3.0
Glass
1.0
Non-ferrous metal
1.0
  • All waste should now be classified according to the European Waste Catalogue (2000/532/EC).
  • 13million tonnes of waste consist of materials that are never used.
  • In Scotland alone, 2.32 million tonnes of C&D waste were recovered, 1.38million tonnes were exempt and 2.57million tonnes were landfilled.
  • The UK construction industry annually produces 3 times the amount of waste of all UK households combined.
  • Construction and demolition waste equates to 25% of all waste produced in the UK.
  • Waste in the UK continues to rise at 3% per year according to the DTI Sustainable Construction Brief April 2004.
  • Waste costs can be reduced immediately through focusing on skip removal, effluent charges and energy costs.
  • Waste costs can also be calculated from the cost of wasted raw materials in skip, the cost of labour and the cost of wasted energy.
  • “Reuse” of Construction Waste should focus on the returning of a product, but not necessarily a waste product, to active use in the same or similar capacity without processing to change it's physical or chemical composition.

 

   
   

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