A
Aerosol Cans  

What can I do with empty aerosol cans?
This depends on your Local Authority guidelines for your recycling scheme, as the gases used to manufacture aerosol cans can be harmful to the Earth’s atmosphere. To find out if aerosols are accepted in your area please contact your Local Authority Helpline or e-mail info@wascot.org.uk. You may not be able to dispose of them at can Recycling Points as they can explode on crushing and so you may have to dispose of aerosol cans with your normal household waste. Alternatively, pump action sprays can be purchased in most retail outlets to reduce the number of aerosols that you need to dispose of.

Aluminium Drinks Cans (See Cans)
Aluminium Foil   (See Foil)
B
Batteries (household)  

What can I do with used batteries?
Household batteries are not currently recycled on a large scale in Scotland, as there are no facilities in the UK that can deal with batteries safely. You can avoid having to dispose of batteries by using electricity from the mains where possible. Alternatively, using rechargeable batteries is more cost effective in the long term, as they can be used again and again. However, this is not always practical and some manufacturers accept used batteries back and send them to be recycled. Some retailers will also accept used batteries of their own brand for recycling. You can return silver oxide (button cell) batteries to retailers or jewellers for recycling.

It may be more cost efficient to form a larger collection for used batteries, eg through a local club, school or workplace, which would allow a larger volume of batteries to be collected. The companies Envirogreen and Rabbitt Recycling both offer this service and you can visit them at:
www.envirogreen.co.uk
www.rabbittrecycling.co.uk

Other useful websites for information on battery recycling include: www.letsrecycle.com
www.wasteonline.org.uk

Why are batteries not collected for recycling?
Unfortunately, there are no reprocessors of household batteries in the UK at the current time. This means it is generally inefficient to collect batteries for recycling as they would require to be transported abroad for reprocessing, generating increased fuel pollution. Many Local Authorities are aiming to provide this type of facility in the near future as batteries become recognised as the source of a significant amount of potentially hazardous waste. To find out more about facilities in your area, please contact your Local Authority Helpline or e-mail info@wascot.org.uk.

It is recommended that you try to make use of electricity from the mains and/or rechargeable batteries where possible, to avoid having to dispose of batteries. However, this is not always practical and some manufacturers accept used batteries back and send them to be recycled. Some retailers will also accept used batteries of their own brand for recycling. It may be more cost efficient to form some sort of larger collection for used batteries, eg through a local club, school or workplace, which would allow a larger volume of batteries to be collected. The companies Envirogreen and Rabbitt Recycling both offer this service and you can visit them at:
www.envirogreen.co.uk
www.rabbittrecycling.co.uk

Other useful websites for information on battery recycling include: www.letsrecycle.com
www.wasteonline.org.uk

Batteries (car) What happens to engine batteries when they are collected for recycling?
Engine batteries contain 60-80% recyclable lead and plastic. When engine batteries are collected for recycling, the lead and plastic are reclaimed and reused in new batteries.
Batteries (mobile phone)   (See Mobile Phones)
Beds   (see Furniture)
Bedding   (See Textiles)
Books

What can I do with my old books?
Used books are collected by charities at some Recycling Centres and Recycling Points in Scotland. To find centres and points that accept books in your area, please click here. Alternatively, you can contact your local charity shops and libraries, as most will be happy to accept donations of usable second hand books.

Can I recycle books with my paper collection?
Books cannot be recycled with other types of paper because the adhesive that binds them together can cause operational problems in the pulping part of the recycling process. Books are normally sent to libraries and charity shops for reuse by others instead of being recycled. You should look for separate book collection points at your local Recycling Centres and Points and please deposit only books that are in good condition. Alternatively, you can contact your local charity shops and libraries, as most will be happy to accept donations of usable second hand books.

What happens to books when they are collected for recycling? Reusable books that are collected for recycling are sent to libraries and charity shops for others to use.

Bottles  

(See Glass/Plastics)

Building Materials   (See Scrap Metal/Wood)
C
Cans

Do I need to separate steel and aluminium cans before recycling?
Both aluminium and steel cans can be recycled and the majority of Recycling Centres and Points will accept both types of cans. Usually it is not necessary to separate cans before they are put into kerbside containers or Recycling Points, but this will depend on the specific guidelines within each Local Authority.

To find out what types of cans are accepted via kerbside schemes in your area, please click here. To find out what types of cans are accepted at Recycling Centres and Points in your area, please click here.

To identify whether a can is aluminium or steel, check the can for recycling symbols. Additionally, holding a magnet to a can identifies which metal the can is made of - steel cans will stick whereas an aluminium can will not.

Do I need to rinse cans before recycling them?
Yes, drinks cans should be rinsed clean and flattened before they are deposited for recycling. Food cans should also be rinsed out to remove any food debris so that this does not contaminate the recycling process. This will also prevent your kerbside container from becoming dirty and/or smelly.

Do I need to remove the labels from cans before recycling them?
No, the labels on food cans are burned off during the recycling process so there is no need to remove them before putting cans in kerbside containers or Recycling Points.

What can I do with empty aerosol cans?
This depends on your Local Authority guidelines for your recycling scheme, as the gases used to manufacture aerosol cans can be harmful to the Earth’s atmosphere. To find out if aerosols are accepted in your area, please contact your Local Authority Helpline or e-mail info@wascot.org.uk. You may not be able to dispose of them at can Recycling Points as they can explode on crushing and so you may have to dispose of aerosol cans with your normal household waste. Alternatively, pump action sprays can be purchased in most retail outlets to reduce the number of aerosols that you need to dispose of.

Where can I buy a can crusher?
You can help to reduce the volume of waste in your recycling bin by crushing your cans at home. To buy online, you can visit:

www.naturalcollection.com
www.naturaldiscovery.co.uk
www.plascancrusher.com

What happens to cans when they are collected for recycling?
Cans that are collected for recycling are recycled into new steel and aluminium cans. Click here to see how your cans are recycled.

Car Batteries   (see Batteries)
Car / Engine Oil  

(See Oil)

Card, Cardboard  

Can I recycle cardboard with my paper collection?
Different recycling schemes have specific guidelines as to what can be included in paper collections, but cardboard is usually collected separately from paper. Some areas accept lightweight card, but not the heavier brown cardboard in paper collections. Card may be accepted depending on the required fibre quality and the type of end products that will be produced. To find out if you can recycle card or cardboard with paper kerbside collections in your area, please click here. To find out if you can recycle card or cardboard at Recycling Centres and Points in your area, please click here. If you are unsure, it is best to leave out any materials that may not be accepted to minimise the risk of contaminating the recyclates (materials that can be recycled). Cardboard can be torn up and included with green waste for home composting, as it helps to absorb some of the moisture and will degrade when mixed with organic materials.

Can I recycle cardboard with my garden/green waste collection?
This depends on specific Local Authority guidelines, as some garden or green waste collections accept cardboard because it can be recycled. Other collections do not accept cardboard to reduce the risk of contamination from the wrong type of materials. To find out if you can recycle cardboard with green waste kerbside collections in your area, please click here. Cardboard can be torn up and included with green waste for home composting, as it helps to absorb some of the moisture and will degrade when mixed with organic materials.

Can I recycle food packaging with my cardboard collection?
The majority of cardboard collections do not accept cardboard that has been in direct contact with food, as this increases the risk of contamination from food debris. It may be acceptable to include food packaging that is clean and free of food debris. This depends on your specific Local Authority guidelines and to find out more, please contact your Local Authority Helpline or e-mail info@wascot.org.uk. Food packaging is often made from more than one material, such as cardboard coated in plastic, and so it is generally advisable to avoid depositing it for recycling.

What happens to cardboard when it is collected for recycling? Cardboard that is collected for recycling is recycled into new cardboard.

Cards  

(see Cardboard)

Carpet & Rugs   What can I do with my old carpet?
You can donate usable carpet to charity, use old carpet as loft insulation or cover your compost heap with it. Woollen carpet can itself be composted with your green waste. If you would like to arrange an uplift for your old carpet, please click here for contacts in your area. For details of groups that redistribute goods like carpet and furniture in your area, please click here.

What happens to carpet when it is collected for recycling?
Carpet that is collected for recycling is reused by others through charities and community groups. For details of groups that redistribute goods like carpet and furniture in your area, please click here.
Cartons  

(See Cardboard/Plastics)

Cartridges   Where can I recycle my used printer/photocopier/fax machine cartridges?
Several organisations collect used cartridges and/or mobile phones for recycling, either for profit or charity. Your old cartridges are of significant value to these organisations, but you should check which types are accepted before sending them to be recycled. Printer, photocopier and fax machine cartridges and mobile phones may be collected for recycling or you may be able to send them directly to the organisation. You can arrange for your school, workplace or community group to recycle their cartridges together, sometimes for cash, as many organisations prefer to collect a large number of cartridges together. For more details on how to recycle cartridges and mobiles, you can visit the following websites:

ActionAid Recycling www.nru. org.uk
Cartridges4charity.co.uk www.cartridges4charity.co.uk
Emptycartridge www.emptycartridge.co.uk
Eurosource Europe Ltd www.recyclingappeal.com


What happens to cartridges when they are sent for recycling?
Several organisations collect printer/photocopier/fax machine cartridges for recycling, either for profit or charity. You can see a comprehensive list of these organisations at www.envocare.org.uk. Your old cartridges are of significant value to these organisations, but you should check which types are accepted before sending them off to be recycled. Reusable cartridges are cleaned, refilled and resold to prevent them going to landfill, helping the environment and raising money for good causes. Your old cartridge shells can be reused several times.

CDs, CD-roms, DVDs, Records, Tapes and Videos How can I recycle my old CDs/CD-roms/DVDs/records/tapes/videos?
A few Local Authorities offer facilities to recycle these items, but on the whole recycling in this area is not well developed. CDs are difficult to recycle since they are a composite of metal film and plastics. CDs etc are collected in Dumfries and Galloway, East Ayrshire, Falkirk and South Ayrshire. To find out more about recycling these items in your area, please contact your Local Authority Helpline or e-mail info@wascot.org.uk. If your area does not currently have facilities to recycle these items, you can donate usable CDs, DVDs, tapes and videos to your local libraries or charity shops to be reused by others. You can also find lots of ideas on how to reuse your old CDs at home at : www.make-stuff.com/recycling/cd.html. You can also send your unwanted CDs and plastic cases (please remove paper inserts) to be recycled or reused by companies such as:

Poly C Reclaimers - www.plasticwaste.co.uk
Polymer Reprocessors - www.polymer-reprocessors.co.uk
Reactivated - www.reactivated.co.uk

Your old CDs and cases are recycled into various products, such as alarm panels, coat hangers and artificial wood.


Clothes (See Textiles)
Comics

(See Magazines)

Composting  

(See Garden Waste)
(See Reduce)

Computers

(See WEEE)

Cooking Oil  

(See Oil)

Cups - (disposable plastics)   (See Plastics)
D
E
Electrical Appliances (See White Goods/WEEE)
Envelopes  

(See Paper)

F
Fabric   (see Textiles)
Foil  

Can I recycle foil/foil containers with my can collection?
This will depend on your specific Local Authority guidelines and will be detailed in the information provided with your kerbside container or at your local Recycling Centres/Points. Alternatively, you can contact your Local Authority Helpline or e-mail info@wascot.org.uk for further information. Foil is often excluded from can collections as it is made from a different grade of aluminium than aluminium cans. This means that they cannot always be recycled by the same process.

Can crisp bags/sweet wrappers be recycled?
Crisp bags and sweet wrappers cannot be recycled in Scotland at the current time. These items are not made from foil and so cannot be recycled with aluminium foil. They are made from a wide range of plastics and often different types blended together. These are much more difficult to identify and separate efficiently than plastic bottles. It is also more difficult to sell the material as markets for mixed plastics are currently limited. Mixing other types of plastic with bottles reduces their value.
Furniture

What can I do with my old furniture?
Furniture exchange schemes accept donations of usable second-hand furniture, and sometimes other household items, to be redistributed to others in need in your local area. For community groups in your area, please click here. These schemes are a good alternative to landfilling or bulky uplifts for old furniture. Please click here to search a full list of all the furniture recycling projects currently operating in Scotland. If your old furniture is not in good condition, you can arrange for a bulky uplift from your Local Authority to have it removed. Please click here for details of the bulky uplift service in your area.

What happens to furniture when it is collected for recycling?
This depends on the specific scheme(s) in operation within your Local Authority, so to find out more please contact your Local Authority Helpline or e-mail info@wascot.org.uk. Some areas have a furniture redistribution scheme in place that passes on reusable furniture to those in need. For community groups in your area, please click here. Furniture may also be resold in charity shops, with or without reconditioning.
Fridges & Freezers   (See White Goods)
G
Garden Waste

What can I do with my excess garden waste when my bin is only collected fortnightly?
If your garden waste bin is full before the next collection date, you can try to compost as much garden waste as possible. This is good for your garden and reduces the amount of waste that is sent to landfill. To find out more about composting at home, please click here. It may be possible to obtain an additional bin for your garden waste, depending on specific guidelines within your Local Authority. To find out more please contact your Local Authority Helpline or e-mail info@wascot.org.uk. You can also take excess garden waste to some Recycling Centres. To find out where garden waste is accepted in your area, please click here.

What happens to garden waste when it is collected for recycling?
Garden waste is normally taken to a central composting facility, where it is shredded and composted. Depending on the system in use and the Local Authority, the compost produced is then used as a quality soil conditioner, for land restoration or for land reclamation. The compost produced may also be sold to industry or householders in your local area. Click here to see how your garden waste is recycled.
Gas Cylinders  

What happens to gas cylinders when they are collected for recycling?
Gas cylinders are returned to manufacturers to be refilled and then reused by householders.

Glass





Do I need to wash glass bottles and jars before recycling them?
Yes, all bottles and jars should be rinsed clean before they are recycled. This ensures that any food debris is removed so that this does not contaminate the recycling process. This will also prevent your kerbside container from becoming dirty and/or smelly.

Do I need to remove the labels from glass bottles and jars before recycling them?
The labels on glass bottles and jars come off during the recycling process, so there is no need to remove them before putting bottles and jars in kerbside containers or Recycling Points. The labels will disintegrate and be removed when the bottles and jars are washed and crushed for recycling.

Can I recycle any other types of glass apart from bottles and jars?
No other types of glass should be included in collections for recycling. This is because items like drinking glasses and cookware are made from different materials and cannot be recycled by the same process. Also, cookware like Pyrex is designed to be heat resistant and so will not melt down during the recycling process. Items such as window glass and lightbulbs contain metal and so cannot be recycled by the same process. Contamination from items other than bottles and jars results in a lower quality of recycled material being produced. It is advisable to put only intact glass items in recycling containers and points, as broken glass creates a hazard for the waste operatives.

What happens to glass when it is collected for recycling?
Glass that is collected for recycling is cleaned, crushed and recycled into new bottles and jars. Click here to see how your glass is recycled. Glass can be recycled infinitely to make new bottles and jars with no reduction in quality as long as it is separated by colour. Mixed colour recycled glass can also be used in various products, such as decorative aggregate for kitchen worktops. Below are some other uses of recycled glass:

  • Abrasives
  • Art and craft products
  • Brick manufacture
  • Cement block filler
  • Concrete paving
  • Construction aggregate
  • Container manufacture, eg bottles and jars
  • Glass-fibre insulation
  • Golf course sand
  • Textured wall coatings
  • Tile manufacturing
  • Water filter medium, eg swimming pools

Click here to see what happens to glass collected for recycling by British Glass.

For more information on glass recycling please visit: www.britglass.co.uk/aboutglass/default.htm
www.rockware.co.uk/index-recycling/index-recycling.html www.wrap.org.uk/glass_home.asp

Glasses   (See Spectacles)

 

 

 
If you have any queries, please email us, or call 01786 471 333.